Your Guide to Writing a Coaching Business Plan

Have you ever thought of writing a coaching business plan but do not know where to start? Way too often, we don’t start things or take the first step because we can’t figure out the tenth step.  But you don’t need to know the tenth step. You only need to know the first step because the first number is always one. 

Your Guide to Writing a Coaching Business Plan

The first step to writing a coaching business plan is to have a good idea of whether your business is viable. After you’ve analyzed the market, it’s time to draw up the business plan.

But first, what is a business plan? A business plan is a detailed analysis of your business, including its objectives and finances. The plan provides an insight into the purpose and vision of your coaching practice and how its goals will be achieved and set out the financial requirements for the practice as well as its projected earnings potential.

Use it as a reference guide, which you can refer to at regular intervals to help you stay on the right track. Don’t treat it as gospel though business needs change over time and therefore so will the business plan. If you keep on top of this and amend your plan accordingly, it will help to ensure your business continues in the right direction.

Why is Writing a Coaching Business Plan Important?

There are two main uses for a business plan. The first is as a sales tool to help you present your case to lenders, investors, and potential business partners. The second is for your own internal use, as a gauge against which you can measure your coaching practice’s development and progress towards its objectives.

Your business plan, therefore, needs to be a compelling document that will impress people and convince them of your ability and the viability of your practice. To make it credible, you’ll have to back it up with detailed research and accurate financial forecasts. Be careful not to make it flat and lifeless though. Don’t just present the facts and figures: turn them into a meaningful and exciting business case. A word of warning though: keep your feet on the ground at all times and ensure that your analysis is truthful and realistic. Investors and lenders will see right through the hype if you overdo it. Also, it is in nobody’s interest to create a misleading impression. On the other hand, though, don’t aim too low. Objectives and financial forecasts that seem far too easy and conservative will not impress and will not provide you with any challenge or incentive to reach your practice’s full potential.

You need to make your business plan balanced. Be upfront about both strengths and weaknesses. Put a positive spin on the weaknesses, though demonstrate what you will do to overcome them.

The Basic Structure of a Good Business Plan

Your business plan should consist of the following:

Summary – This is basically a concise synopsis of your coaching practice and the plan. A potential investor or lender will probably read this part only when they are inundated with similar reports and documents. By reading these crucial couple of pages, they can judge whether something is worth further consideration. Writing the summary once you’ve finished your plan will ensure that you don’t miss anything out. Make it impressive and attention-catching.

Company Information – This section provides some context by outlining what your coaching practice is all about. Include the structure of the organization, its history, its vision and mission, information on the industry, an analysis of the customer base, a description of the products or services offered. You’ll need to give all the facts to help the reader understand what your practice does, but provide more than this. Don’t just describe what your practice does, but also what makes it stand out – its benefits and key selling points.

The Management & Team – Here you outline a brief CV for each of the members of your management team. Also, include any external consultants whose services you employ. Make it clear what they can bring to the company. Show the different departments if relevant and explain what types of positions will be held in each of these areas. Provide a plan as to how you will recruit, train, and manage your workforce.

Promotion and Sales – In this section, you should include all of your market research. Show that you fully understand your intended clients and your competitors. Outline how you will deal with competition in the market. Explain your plans for advertising your practice and promoting your coaching products and services.

Operations – How will your business work? Provide details of where your company will be located, whether it will own or rent its premises, what materials and equipment you will need, what IT and other systems you will use.

Financial Analysis – Summarize the figures at the beginning of the section to outline the main messages. Include costs for every area of your business and do an in-depth projection of the financial outlook for the practice for the next year, as well as an outline sketch of the likely financial future over the next five years or so. You should include profit and loss accounts, cash flow, sales projections, etc. 

To wrap up your business plan, you could also include a more general future vision for your coaching practice, to give lenders or investors an impression of how your company will shape up and what financial returns they might receive from it. 

Now go, and write a coaching business plan!

Would you like an endless stream of new coaching clients? Simply click the image to the right and email and I’ll send you free videos with step-by-step blueprints for generating a massive income from high paying coaching clients.

Jeannie Cotter
Editor/Writer
Writer, Coaches Training Blog community