3 Sample Business Plan for Life Coaching

Using sample business plans for life coaching is a great way to figure out how to compose your own business plan. Using the work of others can help you get it done faster and can also help you make it better.

Sample Business Plans for Life Coaching

Sample Business Plans for Life Coaching – Le Moal Olivier © 123RF.com

No Copy and Paste Coaching Business Plans

Though it’s a great tool to use sample business plans or templates as guides for your own business plan, it should never be a copy and paste procedure. Sample business plans for life coach practices should be used as a guide or a reference; your business will be unique, and your business plan should be filled with your words, goals, values, mission, and vision. Not someone else’s!

3 Sample Business Plans for Life Coaching

Here are 3 sample life coaching business plans that you can use as a quick guide when composing your own plan.

Sample Coaching Business Plan #1

Company Description

Administrative needs – office space, licenses, permits, bookkeeping software, other hardware and
Software needs.
Business organization – corporation, sole proprietorship, LLC, etc.
SWOT analysis – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats.
Goals

Coaching Description

Values
Vision Statement
Mission Statement

Market Analysis

Target market description
Profile of competitors
Outcomes you can provide your clients
Marketing methods and analysis

Sample Coaching Business Plan #2

This is for a business who might have or plan to have employees in the future.
You can use all the same categories as in business plan #1, but add a section for employees

Coaches

Employees or independent contractors
Hiring practices and methods – interviewing, experience level, background screening, etc.
Compensation

Sample Coaching Business Plan #3

This cab be sub-titled, The Lazy Coaches Guide to Sample Business Plans for Life Coaching.” This is the simplest one I could find.

SWOT Analysis

Determine your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

SOAR Analysis

This is often used instead of SWOT, but for this simple plan, it is used in addition to SWOT. It
Stands for strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results. It helps to replace goals, values, mission statement, and vision statement.

Life Coaches Need Business Plans

You may think that because you are a one-person shop, a business plan is extraneous and unneeded fluff. Nothing could be further from the truth!

A business plan is a way to anticipate and plan for success; it is also a way to offer a contingency plan in case success isn’t as forthcoming as you hoped for. Sample business plans for life coaching offer insight into what makes for a good business plan – one that can help you build success and prevent failure!

I Promise – It’s Not That Hard to Create a Business Plan

With the use of sample plans and templates, creating a workable business plan is fairly easy. Yes, it will take a little time, a measure of dedication to the task, and a commitment to finishing it. No, it won’t magically appear without some work!

However, it’s not that time consuming, it doesn’t take that much dedication, and the commitment isn’t that burdensome. With the help of a few sample business plans for life coaching, it’s actually quite easy!

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Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

Why You Need a Business Plan for a Coaching Business

Yes – you need a business plan for a coaching business. You might think that you’re just a one-man, or one-woman shop, and your coaching business is so small that a business plan couldn’t possibly be important.

You’d be wrong!

Business Plan for a Coaching Business

Business Plan for a Coaching Business – rawpixel © 123RF.com

Every Business Needs a Business Plan

Whether you operate as a sole proprietorship, or you run a multi-national corporation, you need a business plan. Just because you are starting a one-person coaching practice doesn’t mean you don’t have to plan – plan for the present and the future!

Why You Need a Business Plan for a Coaching Business

A business plan serves as your founding documents. They are like your Constitution and will serve to outline your values, your target market, and your goals. Business plans for coaching businesses are crucial to success and also function as a reference guide going forward.

2 Now Reasons to Write a Business Plan

  • Clarify your business concept. What type of coaching will you do? Who is your target market? Does your target market have the numbers and the disposable income to fill your calendar and pay your fees? Can you offer the outcomes your target market seeks?
  • Se down your goals in writing. Your goals are contained in your mission and vision statements. Where do you want the business to be in one year? Three years? Five years? What is the reason for your business – why does it exist?

2 Future Reasons to Write a Business Plan

A business plan for a coaching business is for the present and the future. It helps you clarify and organize so you can get the business off to a good start. It also details goals, values, and vision so at some point, or points, in the future, you can look back and see how you are doing.

Here are two future reasons why a business plan helps:

  • Allows you to design new products or services that align with your values and goals. Create group coaching, an online coaching service, books, DVDs, or seminars that fit your target market and values.
  • Serves as a reference guide as you make any other future decisions. A business plan for a coaching business is like an owner’s manual for your practice.

A Business Plan Should be Flexible

Founding documents can sometimes be inflexible and hard to amend – look at our country’s own founding papers. However, a business plan needs o be much more adaptable and flexible. As the owner of the business, you have the power to modify and later it at any time. However, it must be for a good reason.

  • Only create new goals when old ones have been reached.
  • Don’t subtract any values – add only if new ones are needed to run an ethical and prosperous coaching business.
  • Create new vision and mission statements that adhere to changing industry and business dynamics.
  • Detail any new products and services you have added or plan to add in the near term.
  • A business plan for a coaching business can grow and expand as your business grows – let it show your personality and your passion.

To learn more about how to generate an endless wave of high paying coaching clients, get your FREE Instant Access to our “Life Coaching Business Blueprint” video toolkit when you go HERE.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

Life Coaching Plan 101 for New Businesses

Welcome to Life Coaching Plan 101 – the starter class for new life coaches. This isn’t about how to plan your client sessions. This is about how to create a clear and comprehensive business plan for your life coaching practice.

Coaching Plan

Coaching Plan – kasto © 123RF.com

Yes – You Need a Business Plan

Don’t take the easy way out and skip writing a business plan. Sure, you can get by without one, and you may even succeed in the business without composing a plan. But, why take that chance when it really doesn’t take too long or involve too much work to write a good plan?

What is Your Coaching Plan?

What are your plans for the business? Do you know? If so, you should write them down. What are your goals? If you know them, you should put them in writing.

Having a plan is more than just dreams in your head. A plan means you can articulate a systematic way you will start and operate your business. It also details the manner in which you will treat clients and the values you will display as a coach.

What a Good Coaching Business Plan Doesn’t Have

Here are things to leave out of your coach plan:

  • Fluff and filler. Don’t just write words to make it look longer. No one is going to see this unless you add a partner or apply for financing – things most starting coaches don’t do.
  • Vague goals. I want to be a great coach is not a measurable goal. Your goals should be specific and measurable. You can certainly dream big, but you also need to be realistic.
  • Too much detail. Writing a coaching plan may seem like a daunting task before you start. However, as some people get into it, they start writing everything down. Too much detail, like too much fluff, is bad. You don’t have to include everything!

What a Good Business Plan Includes

When writing a business coaching plan for your life coaching practice, here are a few essentials:

  • Administrative section. This is where you include everything it takes to start your business and operate it indefinitely. Licenses, permits, accounting methods, office space, type of software, website development; everything that runs your business and pushes it forward
  • Values, Vision, and Mission. Every business plan must have these sections. A values section lists the values with which you will coach and run your business. A vision section is an inspirational description of what you want to achieve or accomplish with your practice – think BIG! A mission statement is the purpose of the business or the reason it exists.
  • Goals. Goals matter and you should list several – make sure they are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-based.
  • Market analysis and market description. Who will you be coaching and how competitive is it in your area (or online)?
  • Marketing. Yes, you must take some time to consider marketing. Your coaching plan for business needs a section on marketing and promotion. Most people hate marketing, but if you take some time to consider the possibilities, and also the ways to measure promotional effectiveness, you will be one step ahead of many other coaches.

By the way… you’re invited to claim your FREE step-by-step “Master Coach Blueprint” video toolkit. Just go HERE now to get your master coach blueprint videos.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

7 Tips for a Business Plan for Coaching Practice

A business plan for coaching practice is essential to business success in the highly competitive coaching industry. If you don’t make one, you start one step behind your competitors. If you create one, you begin at the same starting line; if you write a great one, you might even be started out one step ahead!

Business Plan for Coaching Practice

Business Plan for Coaching – PracticeNopporn Suntornpasert © 123RF.com

Ready, Set, Go to Coaching Success

There are so many different ways you can increase your chances of success as a coach. One of the first steps happens before you even open your doors.

Write a business plan. For coaching practices, or for any type of business, a business plan will serve as a foundational document and a source of inspiration. It provides a handy reference guide as you move forward and gives you a written document on which to base future decisions in your practice.

7 Tips for a Business Plan for Coaching Practice

You’re ready to sit down and start composing a business plan. Oh, where oh where to begin?

Don’t let a temporary case of writers’ block or the inability to find a starting point delay or deter you. Just start! Start in the middle, start in the end, start anywhere!

Here are a few quick suggestions to help you start and finish a business plan.

  • Use a template for a business plan. For coaching practice business plans, don’t expect it to be a breeze. But, when you use a template, you instantly have a framework into which you can put the details of your own unique business. You can find free samples and templates all over the Internet.
  • Give yourself plenty of time. Most people don’t create a good plan in one day. It may take a few days or a few weeks. Give it time and you will come up with something valuable and workable.
  • Focus! Don’t write while doing something else – multitasking isn’t a good thing when writing a plan. Have a quiet space and allot some time to the endeavor.
  • Use an accepted analysis method like SWOT or SOAR. SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. SOAR stands for strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results.
  • Make it comprehensive but not overly long. One page probably won’t make the grade; a forty-page document is mostly likely overkill! A few pages with several sections should suffice for your business plan. For coaching practice plans, sections can include Administrative, Mission Statement, Vision Statement, Values, Target Market, Marketing, Alternate Streams of Income.
  • Ask your peers. If you have good relationships with other coaches, it’s wise to show them a draft of your plan. Experienced coaches can often provide valuable insight as to any missing information or details.
  • Goals matter. Write down some specific goals. When coaching your clients on goals, you may be telling them to create SMART goals. You should do the same in your business plan. For coaching practice plans, SMART goals are: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. A few different goals will serve as motivational tools as you move forward in your coaching career.

Give this strategy a try and see for yourself that it works. If you liked this coaching tip, leave a comment or use the handy bookmark buttons below to share it with others on Facebook, Twitter, Digg, etc. Thanks!

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

You Don’t Need One: Business Plan – Life Coaching Practice

Contrary to what you may have read, you don’t need one – a business plan – life coaching practice. Nope. You can start a business without one. You can probably succeed in business without one. So, why write one?

Business Plan Life Coaching Practice

Business Plan Life Coaching Practice – Scandinavian Stock © 123RF.com

Business Plan – Life Coaching Practice – the Reason Why

If you don’t need a business plan, why would you waste the time to write one? Well, there’s one great reason for taking the time to develop and compose a business plan for your life coaching practice.

That reason is – drumroll, please – it will probably make your business better in the present and the future. That’s it! You don’t need it, and you may very well succeed and prosper without one, but it can, and often does, make a business better – now and later.

A Business Plan Helps Your Business Now

Starting out in business is a daunting task. Guess what helps get you started correctly? That’s right – a business plan! Life coaching practice or clown costume store – you need a plan to create a successful business!

There are so many things to do and so many decisions to make. Don’t you think you would get off to a better start if you wrote down your ideas and formulated a plan and put it on paper? Don’t you think you would be less likely to forget or overlook something if you took some time to brainstorm and put your thoughts into a document?

A carefully crafted, concise and comprehensive business plan will ensure you take the necessary steps to build a strong administrative foundation for your life coaching practice. It also helps you select the right niche, define your target market, and create a marketing action plan.

A Business Plan Helps Your Business in the Future

To remain competitive in the future, you should have a business plan. Life coaching practice, car assembly factory, or medical marijuana dispensary – a business plan is like a founding document.

Operating a business is a grind. It also takes patience, persistent, and perseverance. But, to be successful in the long term, a business also has to be adaptable, flexible, and roll with the punches. A clear and concise business plan will help you make the needed changes throughout the years while still sticking to your values

Remaining true to your vision while adapting to changes is one of the best reasons to create a business plan. Life coaching practices and all businesses benefit from having a business plan!

A Business Plan is Your Constitution

Think what the United States would be if we didn’t have our Constitution. That great document laid a strong foundation for both the beginning of the country and for its future.

Would the United States still have succeeded if our founding fathers hadn’t created a Constitution? Perhaps. But, are we better off that they took the time to write down the values under which we would live, and some mechanisms for instilling and retaining those values.

That’s why you need a business plan – life coaching practice or cheese sculpting business (yes, there really is one of these). Business plans matter and though you don’t need them, they can help make your life coaching practice even better!

By the way… you’re invited to claim your FREE step-by-step “Master Coach Blueprint” video toolkit. Just go HERE now to get your master coach blueprint videos.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

7 Questions to Ask Before You Write a Career Coaching Business Plan

A career coaching business plan is a must – writing one is a critical first step when starting a career coaching business. Don’t spend the time and money getting your business off the ground without first taking the time to compose a comprehensive and concise business plan.

Career Coaching Business Plan

Career Coaching Business Plan – Marek Uliasz © 123RF.com

Do You Really Need a Business Plan?

Yes – you really need a business plan, no matter what business you’re starting. There’s no equivocation on this question – write one before you start coaching!

You Don’t Know How to Write a Business Plan?

It’s not too difficult, and there are hundreds of samples, templates, and examples across the Internet. Most are free. Taking the time to think about your business, imagining what your business will be like in the future, and using these templates as a guide, and you can create your very own career coaching business plan!

Yes – you need one, and yes, it’s not that hard to write one that works for your business.

7 Questions to Ask Before You Write a Career Coaching Business Plan

Here are a few questions to consider as you think about and write your business plan. These questions will guide you through the process and help you create a career coach business plan that works!

  1. What need are you serving? Is there a need for you to serve? Are there potential clients actively searching for what you offer? You don’t want to be offering a solution for which there is no problem.
  2. Who will you be serving? This question and the one above will help you define your target market. It will guide you when making decisions on marketing, niches, and viability of future decisions.
  3. What are your objectives and goals for the first year and the next, and the next? A career coaching business plan should be focused both on the short and long-term. You certainly don’t need goals for every year, but having them for the first year, perhaps the third year and fifth year will help you create future strategy and inform the decision-making process.
  4. Who are you as a coach? What values you drive you as a person and a coach? What values will guide you in conducting your business? What values have priority and what are secondary? Answering this question comprehensively will give your business meaning and direction.
  5. Are your objectives need to be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timebound? Once you have listed objectives, the next step is to see if they are SMART ( Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timebound). Goals that aren’t SMART are difficult to achieve or measure.
  6. Where is your passion? Do you have a specific passion for a specific group of people? Like working with college graduates? Like focusing on career women? Your plan should contain details on your passions.
  7. Where is your expertise? Do you have the outcomes your specific target market is seeking? Combining your passion with your expertise will create a powerful coaching force that can propel your business to a prosperous future.

These 7 questions will give shape and substance to any career coaching business plan, and help you develop a plan which guides the present and the future.

To learn more about how to generate an endless wave of high paying coaching clients, get your FREE Instant Access to our “Life Coaching Business Blueprint” video toolkit when you go HERE.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

The Most Important Item on a Coach Business Plan

Writing a coach business plan? If you have a coaching business or are planning to start one, then you should be writing one. If you’ve had a coaching business for a few years and have achieved some measure of success without having a business plan, then power to you! But, you should still write one!

Coach Business Plan

Coach Business Plan – piksel © 123RF.com

Why You Need a Business Plan

Whether you are starting a coaching business or a grave digging company, you need a business plan. Whether you are opening a one-person shop or a company with many employees, you need to create a business plan. Whether you plan to raise money or just take the starting funds out of your pocket, you still need a comprehensive and concise business plan.

Hear are a few reasons to have a business plan:

  • Depicts the organizational structure and type of business. Even if the business is one person, decisions need to be made on type of business (corporation, LLC, sole proprietorship, etc.)
  • Sets your values and goals down on paper. This is especially important for coaches as they must work within the framework of a set of values and run their business the same way.
  • Clarifies present direction and details a future vision. A coach business plan will describe your niche, marketing methods, target market, and action plans to reach your goals, while also providing a glimpse of the impact your business should have and where you see it in three, five, or ten years.
  • A comprehensive coaching business plan serves as a handy reference guide. As your business grows, it is easy to lose your way, forget your values, and stray from your goals. A visit to the business plan, can remind you of who you are as a coach and a business person.

The Most Important Section of a Coach Business Plan

A good business plans has many sections. These include:

  • Administrative
  • Mission Statement
  • Vision Statement
  • Values
  • Marketing and Promotion
  • Target Market
  • Niche

Every section in a business plan is important, but it can be argued that the vision statement is the most crucial to success. If you look up business plan samples and templates, most will suggest that a vision statement should be a sentence or two. I disagree.

A vision statement should be more detailed than just a sentence or two. It should clearly state where the business should be at several intervals. The coach business plan is all about measuring success, and if there are detailed “visions” for one year, three years, five years, and one, the business plan will be more valuable.

There should be alternate goals. You might list different directions – stay a one-person shop, expand with the addition of other coaches, or expand into multiple niches. You might also list alternate streams of income – books, DVDs, seminars, online coaching, etc. – and create basic plans which may or may not be followed, depending on the current market.

All Coaching Visions Matter

A coach business plan should be replete with various visions. It doesn’t mean, all visions have to come true – it merely means that a business plan should have a healthy does of reality, realistic motivation, and big dreams! Every possible vision matters – include it in the business plan and it may come true!

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like step-by-step blueprints for generating a massive income from high paying coaching clients, I invite you to claim your FREE ACCESS to the “Life Coach Salary Secrets” video toolkit.  Go HERE to get it FREE.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

Life Coaching Business Plan Template – Free is Best

Here’s another jumble of keywords: Life coaching business plan template free. Internet bloggers and content writers are often faced with grammatical torture tests when writing to fit a keyword, and this is one of those torture tests!

Life Coaching Business Plan Template Free

Life Coaching Business Plan Template Free – everythingpossible © 123RF.com

Life Coaching Business Plan Template Free – Discussed

Let’s take this phrase and see what we come up with that will help coaches in their quest to create a thriving coaching practice.

Life Coaching Rocks!

The first two words go together like peanut butter and jelly, so we won’t separate them here. Life coaching is what you’re doing, or what you aspire to do. That’s why you’re here – finding tidbits of information that will help your career and business. If you don’t already know, life coaching is a wonderful vocation – you get to help countless individuals reach their goals and dreams while also making a decent living (or a very, very good living!).

What is a Business Plan?

The next two words go together just as the first two words did. A business plan is a reference guide and a roadmap for your business. It outlines you goals and values and provides a workable action plan to reach those goals. It is a crucial foundational document for your coaching practice – whether you are part-time or full-time. It’s the most important part of this keyword phrase: life coaching business plan template free.

What is a Business Plan Template?

A business plan template is basically a sample of what your business plan should look like. It provides you with an organizational reference when creating your own unique business plan. Though you never want to cut and paste – using a template is the best way to create a functional business plan. You definitely want to use a life coach business plan template. Free is good, too!

Why Use a Free Business Plan Template?

If you have a choice between something that is free and something that will take money from your pocket, what do you do? Well, first you make sure that the free product is what you need and a quality product. You know what? There are many quality free business plan templates online. A quick Google search will you give you numerous results. The best thing to do is to locate a few different samples and use them to create your own plan. When looking for a life coaching business plan, free is best!

Even Part-Time Coaches Need a Business Plan

You may think that starting a part-time coaching business doesn’t require a business plan. You would be wrong. Part-time coaches have just as strong a need for a plan – perhaps even more! Starting a part-time business often means you are also working another job. This scenario requires even greater focus! A business plan can serve as a tool for focus, motivation, and inspiration.
So – lesson of the day boys and girls – you need a business plan for your life coaching business, whether it is part or full time. Now you have the full picture: Life coaching business plan template free! Go out and prosper!

By the way… you’re invited to claim your FREE step-by-step “Master Coach Blueprint” video toolkit. Just go HERE now to get your master coach blueprint videos.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

A Sample Business Coaching Plan

A business coaching plan can help you map out, organize, and prioritize the way you work with each client. Having a cohesive and comprehensive plan can improve results, and ultimately boost your business. The more satisfactory results you get, the more clients you will have!

Business Coaching Plan

Business Coaching Plan – kasto © 123RF.com

Coaching Plan – Not a Business Plan

Every business needs a business plan – a written foundational document that details various aspects of a business. But, here I am talking about an actual coaching plan – how you will go about helping each client achieve their goals and dreams.

You need both – a business plan and a business coach plan!

Ignore either of these at your own peril!

An Outline for a Business Coaching Plan

Here is a quick outline for a coaching plan – this works for any type of coaching business

Initial Session

This is where the assessment process begins – a sort of get-to-know-you session. This can be done with interview questions, casual conversation, active listening techniques, and questionnaires. Goals and objectives are discussed. It’s also the best time to analyze the client’s ability to be coached and their receptiveness towards coaching.

Second Session

In this session, the coach and the client go over the assessments. This can mean discussing what was talked about in the initial session or going over any assessment question that may have been given as “homework.” Obstacles to success and behavior issues can be discussed here. This session should give the coach a comprehensive overview of what the client needs and expects.

Third Session

Goals and objectives are clarified in this session and strategic plans are begun. The groundwork has been laid and the journey has begun. The business coaching plan is being set in motion. All aspects of a coach’s training are brought into this session, from behavioral analysis to positive psychology.

Remaining Sessions

All the remaining sessions will be based on the previous session. The business coaching plan will have many variables, and twists and turns at this point. This is where coaching skills are tested, and the cream rises to the top. You need to go with the flow, and when that flow gets stagnate, you need to have the skills to push it forward. Goals can be revisited, strategic plans can be modified, and additional assessments can be made as needed.

Later Sessions

As you near achievement of goals, accountability and feedback become even more important. Taking the time to analyze progress will benefit both the coach and the client. Feedback become a vital component of each session (though feedback is always important).

No Template is Perfect for Coaching

Templates and samples are a great way to organize and prioritize your coaching sessions, but the real coaching sessions never go exactly as planned. Just like having a game plan in sports, a coaching plan is only a framework, not something which can be changed or adjusted according to the variables that occur.

A business coaching plan is an absolute necessity, but it’s only a start. Combined with high-level coaching skills, you will certainly be able to find the outcomes which your clients seek, and make your name in the coaching world!

Would you like an endless stream of new coaching clients? Simply click the image to the right and email and I’ll send you free videos with step-by-step blueprints for generating a massive income from high paying coaching clients.

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community

Business Plans for Life Coaches are Not Optional

Business plans for life coaches are essential founding documents – they are not optional! If you don’t create a business plan for your life coaching business, you are setting yourself up for failure – at the very least, you are positioning yourself to not be as successful as you could be!

Business Plans for Life Coaches

Business Plans for Life Coaches – Nonwarit Pruetisirirot © 123RF.com

Your Business Plan Should be Unique

Though you can find numerous templates and sample online, and it is advisable to use one of these templates to construct and organize your business plan, you should not just copy and paste. Samples are guides, and should only be used as guides. Even though life coaching businesses have many similarities, and life coaches do many of the same things, each one is unique – business plans should also be unique.

Why Every Life Coach Needs a Business Plan

Remember, business plans for life coaches are not optional – if you are a life coach, you need one before you venture into the field.

  • It helps you focus. If you spend the time to write something down, you will be more likely to focus on it as you move forward. Business plans for life coaches are the founding documents and will be used as references as long as the coaches are still practicing.
  • It helps you organize. If you take the time to write a comprehensive business plan, this will help you prioritize and organize as you get more experience and clients.
  • To map the future. A good plan can detail alternate futures and provide insight and information on action that may need to be taken when your business hits a fork in the road or an obstacle.
  • To identify and emphasize your values, vision, and mission. As your business experiences the roller coast ride that faces most companies, having your values, vision, and mission, identified and written down, is extraordinarily valuable. When times get tough, it’s always good to take a few moments and read about who you are as a coach and a business owner (this is what you write down when you create a business plan). A business plan for a life coach will keep you grounded and focused on what’s important!
  • To thoroughly identify your target market, competition, and ways to promote to your market. Promotion is the lifeblood of any business – you can’t be a great coach unless clients sign up for your coaching!

Business Plan for Life Coaches – No Excuses

There are a million reasons not to write a business plan for your life coaching business:

  • I’m too busy
  • It takes too long
  • I don’t know how to write one
  • I don’t need one – I already know what I’m doing
  • I’m a coaching genius

These are not reasons – they are excuses!

It can’t be emphasized enough – writing a business plan is not an option. Business plans for life coaches are integral parts of every coaching practice. They are the strong foundation on which a successful business is built. They are essential to the health and prosperity of every coaching business.

Give this strategy a try and see for yourself that it works. If you liked this coaching tip, leave a comment or use the handy bookmark buttons below to share it with others on Facebook, Twitter, Digg, etc. Thanks!

Fred Philips
Business Coach
Writing Team, Coaches Training Blog Community